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20121207
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
without a "can't lose" attitude. we'll meet a high school [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase your risk of having a st
for employees. bob bruno, a labor and employment relations professor at the university of illinois at chicago joins us this morning on set. good morning to you bob. > > good morning. > are unions the answer here? > > i think unions can be the answer. they have been historically. but in these particular cases, something truly creative is going on. these workers are really not demanding a union election vote or a collective bargaining agreement. they are talking about raising standards. they are talking about conditions that are poor and trying to put some pressure on these employers to raise those up. > are the conditions that poor? is the working wage that awful? > > this wage is pretty bad. we are talking about very profitable companies, very profitable industries, in most metropolitan areas; and these workers, on average, will bring in roughly around $22,000, $24,000 a year. and for about half these workers, they are the principal breadwinners. that is about $9-something an hour, without benefits. so it's pretty bad. > > here is a statement coming from rob karr. he is a lobbyist with the il
. there is no complex in the world that can touch it. >> i'm here with bob, and he has kindly agreed to tell me everything i need to know about casting. i'm going to suit up and next, we're in the water. >> what any gentleman should do. golden gate angling has free lessons the second saturday of every month. we have equipment show up on the 9:30 on the second saturday of every month and we'll teach them to fly cast. >> ok. we are in the water. >> let me acquaint you with the fly rod. >> nice to meet you. >> this is the lower grip and the upper grip. this is a reel and a fly line. we are going to use the flex of this rod to fling away. exactly as you moved your hands. >> that's it? >> that's it. >> i'm a natural. >> push both arms forward and snap the lower hand into your tummy. push forward. >> i did gave it a try and had great time but i might need some more practice. i met someone else with real fly casting skills. her name is donna and she is an international fly casting champion. >> i have competed in the casting ponds in golden gate park in san francisco. i have been to japan and norway fo
#: 1-800-345-2550 well, if itmr. margin?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. >>> have you noticed that the experts may be pessimistic worrying about the fiscal cliff, but the global stock market may be on a tear? let's look at some of these numbers. this is great stuff. hong kong is up 19%. this is in the past year. german dax up 25%. the french cac up 11%. thailand up 43%. japan up 6%. year to date, the usa is up over 12%. that ain't bad. let's bring in our pal, jim iuor iuorio. you know, jim, it's turning out to be a very good year and it's turning out to be a very good year on a global basis. >> no doubt about it. but let's break it down. japan's stock market has rallied huge because of promi
] to learn more about the cold truth well, if itmr. margin?margin. don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. >>> and we are back. twitter is erupting tonight over breaking news out of michigan where republicans in the state have passed a right to work law. kevin tweets, "michigan must be crazy. right to work legislation quickly brings lower wages. aren't they suffering enough?" and ellen vollbrecht says "the name right to work is one of the biggest cons. it's not right to work. it's the right to be fired for any reason whether right or wrong." keep sharing your thoughts with us on facebook and on twitter using #edshow. >>> coming up, apple ceo tim cook announces plans to produce some of their computers right here i
from republican senator bob corker. tonight, we get a different perspective on the question of so-called entitlements. many lawmakers and economists have argued it's essential to make big changes to medicare and social secity. o tho ideas are rsing the eligibility age; means- testing for wealthy recipients; cuts in spending and benefits and a bigger role for private competition in health care. max richtman has been arguing against making many of these changes as part of this fight. he's the president of an advocacy group, the national committee to preserve social security and medicare. he joins us now. >> welcome. >> thank you for inviting me. >> first of all, why shouldn't social security and medicare be part of the entire group of government spending programs that arebeing looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entitlement." th
right now. thank you. host: thank you. we could get that information as well. bob, mich. on the independent line. good morning to you. bob are you there? i think we lost bob this morning. i want to talk with this issue of age discrimination and who is on unemployment insurance. here is an article from "the baltimore sun." 93,000 young adults in maryland are unemployed. what ages are on unemployment insurance at this point? guest: historical you tend to see younger workers with less experience on unemployment, because of this recession we see a much wider spread. more people with college degrees, older people taking on income and benefits of some kind, but the challenges once you get past the six-month blocked, the longer you are on unemployment without a job, the harder it is to find a job. if you have a college degree, and you really need to get a job, to some degree you can move down the economic ladder. you might not want to, it might not be positive for society, but when you do? pg when you do that, it pushes someone -- but when you do that, it pushes someone else fu
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. time to wake up, everyone, as you take a live look at new york city. welcome back to "morning joe." back with us on set we have donny deutsch, mark mckinnon, and richard haass. >> let's start -- there's so much to talk about but, richard, let's start in egypt. absolutely fascinating. i think a lot of people across the world were so heartened by the democratic, we thought, perhaps uprising that was going on in egypt. certainly we all knew to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally, and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majorityism. people like morsi win elections but winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern. the question is whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he di
. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. the troops love me. we have a big big hour and the iq will go way up. [ music ] >> this is the "full-court press," "the bill press show," live on your radio and current tv >> bill: alan saint pierre from norml is going to come on to talk about what happens now incomed and washington state other than a lot of people lighting up. what are the feds going to do? what are the states going to do? we will get to that in the next hour. heading toward here we are, december 7th, rounding out 2012 and, you know, at this time of year, everybody does lists. this is the list season. right? yahoo has started it by looking back the some of the finds yahoo has found what people were searching for obsessed by. the web life editor, heather cabot. >> thank you for having me. >> what are americans into this year? overall, when people came to yahoo as a search engine what were they looking for? >> i think you will be pleas antsly surprised -- pleas antsly surprised. this is the third time we have been putting together these lists, the top search was a n
secretive? how is it that you know how many times i've listened to a bob dylan song or any other song and yet we never get to know anything about you guys? >> we think holding our product plan secret is very important because people love surprises. >> this was one surprise apple could not have loved, the new samsung ad campaign. it's blistering, bold, damaging. it portrays apple products and people who love them as somehow passe and uncool, even desperate. it's a blunt instrument disguised as satire and it's a frontal attack on a ant that would have been unthinkable not too long ago. >> what did you just do? >> just sent my playlist. >> the galaxy s3. when do you think we'll be able to do that thing? >> hey. >> hey, mom, dad. >> thanks for holding our spot. >> you guys have fun. home by midnight, you two. >> the next big thing is already here. >> this ises the line for apps. >> the unmistakable message right there, apple products are for your parents. samsung makes the really cool stuff and they're much more casu about it. they came along and tried to paint those with white earbuds, a
toss it to bob. bank of america continues its tear up 1.75% new 52-week high in today's session of 1064. on our radar this morning. let's send it over to bob with more on what's moving. >> happy friday. what a week. futures popped ten points on the jobs report even though october was revised downward rather notably. a good open. materials, techs, financials leading the way. i wish i could be more optimistic on the fiscal cliff. a gloomy commentary this morning. expectations are getting narrow. grand bargains are out and the idea of maybe the fallback position is pass a simple tax bill like the one the senate had. the simple bill here. you have tax cuts for middle class but not for people over 250,000. you have dividends and capital gains going to 23.8%. that's the senate bill. and that's it. you leave out estate tax and leave out payroll tax cut and unemployment extension and you leave that out. no delay in the sequestration. this is pretty thin gruel. this is what's tossed about and talked about today overall. is that enough to satisfy the markets? remember, the two requirements, got t
report, seasonaled justments will be a huge factor relative to sandy. >> bob and michelle are here. and my biggest question, if all the companies are pulling the give dends forward, the u.s. government thinks it will be taking in x amount based on what they would normally get for dividends plus whatever the hirer rate is going to be. it will drop substantially, correct? >> you'll get leads and lags in the revenues. a lead into this year, a lag next year. pretty obvious how this works. in terms of tax planning, let hope they know to take account of this. the argument will argue how great this is working and when there's a shortfall, how did that happen. so i hope we don't go that route. but this administration has been very big on these kinds of things, basically distorting what's going on and this current thing about the mandate really bothers me. so i woouldn't -- >> i think the challenge is being forward looking. there's big challenges not just because the challenge in terms of getting all the information, but also if win terms of trying make the budget numbers look good and you
to avoid the sequestration. >> bob samuelson, "washington post". i think the proposals are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000, and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there's much speculation thamuch speculr cuts in the pentagon budget would reduce the additional cuts in both the army and the marines. if the marines was put in a position where it had to occupy and protected the oil field of the persian gulf for an extended period of time say five or six years are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the reasons at least i was able to get through as chairman is to try not to speculate much on hypothet speculate much on hypothetical. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now, and i think they are in the 13 budget, so basically they have been on the hill, the beginning of them they have been on the hill for the better part of a year and they are reductions both of chiefs of those to services and the chairman also. clearly, and i did as well when i was the chairman over year ago, there was a need to come down. there was an expectati
because we at bob brooks stone capital management have been very bullish in the 2008 crisis. it produced some stellar total return for our clients that include the interest on a tax rebate and appreciation. dennis: would you prefer that i as your client buy an entire bond or maybe ought to buy a basket in an e t f or something. >> without a doubt. the opportunity we have seen through actively managed mutual funds. what happened in 2008 was indiscriminate selling across the entire sector. it created a miss pricing in many of the bonds and a lot of these mass and -- managers were able to take advantage of that. in terms of bikers of vacation and getting access to literally thousands of bonds, a much better plan to actively -- actively managed funds and take individual bonds for your portfolio. dennis: you probably run one of those and get good fees on its though that is totally fine. when i do this i am going to buy bond. and by buying it to hold onto until maturity or am i buying it so i conflict and selling when it goes up in price? >> with funds there is no maturity. you're buying a bas
by reaching hosted by bob casey. senator bob casey of hearing. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
are pleased to have our distinguished colleagues chuck schumer from new york, bob mendez from new jersey and i believe senator gillibrand will be here shortly. the senators have been a strong partners in this rebuilding effort. it is a great privilege to work together. we are really strong team we share the value of a quick action and sufficient resources to get this job done. as i mentioned, we are in the largest transportation. in the country and it takes diligence and skill of our friends and colleagues. senator schumer. >> thank you, mr. chairman. first, thank you for this hearing but also for your great partnership. new york and new jersey were together as a bipartisan by-date delegation along with our colleagues from rest of the northeast to deal with this awful, awful devastation. it is good you are in so many important positions that will have a lot of say in how we deal with this and we're grateful for that as well as your leadership. thank you, ranking member, senator wicker. west hamilton beach was in my old congressional district. it is one of the few volunteer fire departments in
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)